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Kenneth Rogoff
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  • ECONOMICS

    Diane Coyle, "Three Cheers for Regulation"

    Project Syndicate - 17 Jul 2018

    For some years now, the Monthly Barometer has been arguing that more regulation is coming. This short article makes our case by explaining in simple terms why contrary to the simplistic view that regulation is inevitably bad for business, there are three important channels through which it can benefit an economy: (1) its market-creating and market-growing role; (2) its ability to enable competition (counter-intuitive but often true); (3) its ability to protect consumers. The question is not whether regulation is good or bad, but whether it is well or badly designed (reads in 7-9 min).

    Published in Weekly selection 20 July 2018

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  • ECONOMICS, PSYCHOLOGY, Wellbeing

    Charlotte Graham-McLay, "A 4-Day Workweek? A Test Run Shows a Surprising Result"

    The New York Times - metered paywall - 19 Jul 2018

    This is an interesting example of how working less may lead to higher productivity. A New Zealand financial firm that let its employees work four days a week while being paid for five says the experiment was so successful that it hoped to make the change permanent. The conclusion: “Supervisors said staff were more creative, their attendance was better, they were on time, and they didn’t leave early or take long breaks.” Not rocket science, but it works! (reads in 6-7 min).

    Published in Weekly selection 20 July 2018

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  • GEOPOLITICS, Europe

    Alina Polyakova and Banjamin Haddad, "Europe in the New Era of Great Power Competition"

    Foreign Affairs (metered paywall) - 17 Jul 2018

    European leaders can no longer hide their anxiety, having understood that “America first” means Europe alone. The continent, divided internally, is losing agency on the world stage, and the Trump administration, now acting as a predator more than as a partner, is tempted to exploit this weakness. How can the EU stand up to Trump and China? If it wants to be a player rather than a chessboard on which great powers compete, its leaders must take responsibility for defense and security and play up their economic strengths. Easier said than done… (reads in 7-9 min).

    Published in Weekly selection 20 July 2018

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