In today’s hyper-connected world, analysis has become a mere commodity. Retrieving it – let alone information – is like drinking from a fire hydrant. For example, Googling “global economic growth" yields 61 million results; “Eurozone deflation”, 1 million; “tensions in south-east Asia”, 2 million, and so on... It should therefore come as no surprise that we get easily lost in this myriad of information and analysis.

In the face of analysis overload, it becomes invaluable to sift, select and frame the issues and opinions that matter. This is why The Monthly Barometer came up with a Weekly Selection of op-eds and articles. Each week, we select just five of them (out of hundreds that are sent to us by our network) that we frame in two or three sentences. These five pieces convey in a succinct and accessible manner the thinking of people whose opinions matter the most in a variety of macro fields: economics, geopolitics, society, environment, technology and psychology. They constitute a “formidable” shortcut to complex analysis by offering insights and snapshots that can be read in just a few minutes and are easy to digest. For those keen to make sense of today’s world, The Weekly Selections are a must-read. They constitute the best antidote to information and analysis overload.

As a new service, The Monthly Barometer is now offering to its subscribers, and a potentially much larger group, a curation of all The Weekly Selections. On any given macro issue, it will be possible to access the best thinking at the tap of key.  This service should therefore be of particular interest to researchers and students enabling them as it does to grasp with ease “who said what and when”.

Subscribers of the Monthly Barometer can access curated Weekly Selections as part of their subscription. 

Researchers and students who do not wish to subscribe to The Monthly Barometer can access them on a pay-as-you-wish basis. Please pay an amount that corresponds to the value you attach to the product. If you don’t want to pay, remember the following: “If something online is free, you are not the customer – you are the product” (Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government).

Curation of weekly selections – A distillation of the opinions that count!


Search



Categories

Tags

Kenneth Rogoff
Filter: Category: PSYCHOLOGY > Human condition
  • PSYCHOLOGY, Human condition, Wellbeing

    Virginia Postrel, "Why Food Is Taking Over Your Life"

    Bloomberg View - 26 Apr 2017

    The business of food has become central to our contemporary culture and a major investment theme. Economists emphasize its “status signaling” dimension, but there is more to it than that. Five reasons make it a perfect match for the digital age: (1) In a world of black boxes, food offers a sense of knowledge and control, (2) Eating is sociable, (3) Food is photogenic, (4) Food businesses combine heritage and innovation, (5) Food is fun (reads in 5-7 min).

    Published in Weekly selection 29 April 2017


  • PSYCHOLOGY, Human condition, Technology, Innovation

    Ryota Kanai, "We Need Conscious Robots"

    Nautilus - 27 Apr 2017

    This is a fascinating article from a neuroscientist and AI researcher that explores whether “introspection and imagination” can make robots better. It delves into the meaning and science of consciousness and looks at how “artificial consciousness” can aim to learn by doing. It poses a fundamental question: can we endow machines with metacognition - the introspective ability to report their internal mental states? (reads in 8-10 min).

    Published in Weekly selection 29 April 2017


  • PSYCHOLOGY, Human condition, Technology, Innovation

    Will Knight, "The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI"

    MIT Technology Review - 13 Apr 2017

    The AI senior editor observes that no one really knows how the most advanced algorithms do what they do - automated decision-making has become inscrutable - and hence argues that deep learning could be a problem. Do we want to just rely on a “black box” method” for an investment, medical or maybe military decision? In consequence, being able to interrogate an AI system about how it reached its conclusions might well become a fundamental legal right (reads in 8-10 min).

    Published in Weekly selection 14 April 2017


  • 154 more articles, please Subscribe to access to all of them.